What is clicker training?

Posted on Sep 29, 2018 in Certified Dog Trainer, Clicker, Dog Training, Positive Association, Positive Reinforcement | 0 comments

Modern trainers use clickers to train their dogs because it aids in the animals understanding of what is rewardable. The animal quickly learns that when it offers the behavior again, it will be rewarded. This positive reinforcement approach will often cause an immediate “wow” moment for both handler and animal. 

The clicker is a small hand-held gadget that emits a sound when you press it.  The sound the clicker makes is a signal to your dog that the behavior it just offered is rewardable.  This “click” is always followed by a food reward. Think: Click and Treat!  Note, the clicker is NOT for getting attention.  

Since the click is always paired with a food reward, we call this training positive reinforcement. There is no need to punish the dog for offering the wrong behavior, be patient and quickly mark the right behavior when it is offered.

Teaching your dog to sit, using a clicker: 

  1. Begin with clicker and treats in one hand, and your dog near by.
  2. Start by clicking and tossing a treat to your dog, repeat a few times.
  3. Next, wait a few seconds to see if your dog will offer a sit. When his bum hits the floor, click and toss him a treat several feet away. Repeat by waiting for your dog to sit again, click and toss a treat. Repeat this several times.
  4. If your dog does not know how to sit, put a treat to his nose and raise it up over his head slowly. When his bum hits the ground, click and let him eat the treat. Repeat until your dog begins to offer a sit for the reward.
  5. Next, add the verbal cue “Sit” or a hand signal just before the behavior is performed, click for the correct behavior and reward.
  6. Repeat with cue added, click the correct behavior and reward.

Here is a video demonstration of me teaching my dog Pablo to target my hand and a novel object: Hand Target using a clicker

Why Does the Clicker Work?

  • The sound is the same every time; and is unique to other sounds the dog hears.
  • The clicker is the fastest way to accurately mark behavior. (I used it to teach my dog to sneeze, lick his lips and touch the Staples Easy Button).
  • The clicker is the fastest way to capture new behaviors your dog does.
  • It aids in keeping your dog in his thinking brain.

Will you always have to use the clicker?

No, you can replace the click with a happy, “yes” once your dog understands the behavior thoroughly. It is not a tool that triggers behavior, it just rewards good choices so they are repeated!  For more clicker examples visit:   https://www.karenpryoracademy.com

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Drop the Leash, Dog Training Video

Posted on Sep 30, 2016 in Certified Dog Trainer, Clicker, Dog Training, Leash Training, Positive Reinforcement, Puppy | 0 comments

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Sept. 2007 Chester, my 8 wk old foster.

Do you wish your dog looked at you more? I could show you thousands of photos of me with dogs and the dog is always looking at me. Why? How is this possible?  Can you feel the connection in this photo? This was the day before I  let Chester go to his forever family, I wanted him to know he could trust people and they would keep him safe.

My secret?  I am good at mirroring a dogs awareness, at reinforcing  small behaviors I like. Tip: I never look at a dog and say “no!” as this makes the dog want to leave me. I have good timing, I reward quickly, and am generous with rewards.  I avoid letting the dog get frustrated because I reward small attempts from the dog toward the ultimate goal. This keeps the dog engaged and wanting to work with me. Tip: When a dog is aware of me, I let him know I am aware of him also, the connection begins here.

Pablo looks at me with dogs in the distance

Pablo reorients to me with dogs in the distance.

I created a video of me training clients dogs, so you can have all my secrets! I am sharing these because I want you and your dog to have a better connection like I do with my own dog, Pablo.

Benefits of my Drop the Leash Video:

  • achieve specific goals in the comfort of your home.
  • improve your dogs recall, quickly 
  • see real-life demos with results
  • build a mirror image of  your dogs attention
  • my techniques put to practical use
  • learn to use a compilation of real life skills, without food
  • how your behavior effects your dog
  • free scripts/booklet of each game I teach 

                       Click here to view the Drop the Leash Promo!

 

Order Your Digital Copy of Drop the Leash Here!

Video Reviews:

“Unbelievable! I learned so much and my dog is coming when I call him!” Peter C.

“Excellent doesn’t even begin to describe Judy as a trainer! She’s helped tremendously with my reactive and nervous border collie mix Annie. She’s gone from a nervous wreck of a puppy to a cool and collective adult who can now interact with other dogs politely” – Olivia R.

“Unique and easy to follow along, I highly recommend this online class for families, reactive dog owners and anyone who wants to teach their dog to relax in more situations. – Sue B.

 

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3 Tips to Changing your Dogs Habit

Posted on Mar 27, 2016 in Clicker, Dog Training, Leash Training, Positive Reinforcement, Puppy |

Tip #1 To change your dogs unwanted habit, you need to know what your dog loves! Once you know the reward your dog is willing to work for, you are ready to change his habit. The same reward may not work for all dogs. 

Popular rewards:

  • Food. I mean high value, like chicken, hotdogs and cheese.
  • Play, such as fetch or tug.
  • Hunting. Allowing some dogs to hunt in the
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    In Judy’s puppy class, all  pups sit and wait calmly before they get to “go play”.

    grass can be highly motivating.
  • Playing with other dogs.
  • Sniffing. If your dog is an olfactory machine, use it to motivate.
  • Verbal praise is rarely enough motivation to change a dogs habit.  

Tip #2 To change your dogs unwanted habit, you need to add a marker, like a clicker or a “yes”, so your dog knows which behavior is rewardable. 

  • Catch your dog doing the right behavior or something close to the desired behavior, click or say “yes” the second your dog does the desired behavior. Reward with something your dog loves.

Tip #3 To change your dogs unwanted habit, you need to offer the reward in a timely manner.  If your dog sits, rather than jumps on you, you mark the behavior and offer the reward quickly. Well timed rewards helps the dog learn that his behavior predicts his favorite reward, hence he will perform the desired behavior more often.

Pablo approaches me

Pablo approaches me.

Bonus Tip Initially, you reward your dog every time he offers the correct behavior. I know this is hard for many dog owners, but it will make a huge difference in how fast your dog changes his habit. Next, start randomly rewarding with the high value, but always let your dog know you are pleased with his new habit.  Over time, you randomly reward

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Pablo sits, I click and reward.

with what your dog loves, but always reward with something pleasant to your dog.  Positive reinforcement works for dogs of all ages, and is a great way to help your dog change his habits.

 

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Does Your Dog Come When You Call?

Posted on Apr 11, 2015 in Canine Good Citizen, Dog Training, Dominance, Leash Training, Pets, Positive Association, Positive Reinforcement, Puppy, Rescue Dog, Safety, Socialization, Training, Unleashed Control | 0 comments

 

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Bonding with my new foster dog

 Many people contact me to help them with recall or getting their dog to come when they call them.

A good recall begins with a strong relationship between the human and the dog. The dog who happily comes when called shares a bond with them and trust them completely. They go to them repeatedly because they associate their owner with good things.

If you call your dog and they look at you as if to say why? “Why should I?”   It would be nice if relationships were that easy, but we know any relationship has a balance of trust and respect.  Anyone parenting children can see similarities as we are able to say “because I said so!” Many of us have learned to give a specific reason, expressing our intentions clearly we will have better success and maintain a healthy relationship with our children in the process.

When we put up a barrier or close the conversation with an intense emotion, we create a sense of frustration, anger or distrust which leads to avoidance.  Avoidance is safer than engaging for a child or dog so they go in the back door or simply put their head down and ignore you.

My foster dogs may think their name is come when they first arrive as they often earn their breakfast when they respond to “come” and then I release them to more freedom.  Hence, conditioning them that Come is a good thing.

My point is if you want your dog to come repeatedly, then reward generously as he is choosing you over that amazing smell in the leaves or snow, that he really would love to investigate.  If he does not come, then I suggest you begin to walk towards him, the second he looks at you, you smile, get down low or bend forward and open your arms with clear intentions and a happy “yes” or click with your clicker and your dog will run to you with excitement much more consistently.

If your dog begins to run to you, but stops 10 or 20 feet away, you can still reward this by tossing him a treat and walking away.  Many dogs have been grabbed when they came close so may avoid being grabbed again as it was scary to them.  Repeat, by calling your dog and tossing the treat again, then walk away, call your dog and get low offer the treat out to the side, quietly drop one on the ground and turn or move away.  You are building a relationship build on trust.  If you or anyone else has tricked this dog, he is smarter now and will not be fooled, never trick a dog or you lose trust and your recall will certainly suffer as a result.

All my foster dogs are usually off leash within 1 week as I condition them that coming to me is 100% positive and feels safe. Enjoy your dog and remember coming when called is much more likely if you are not dominating, but building a trusting relationship.

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Dog Training vs Management

Posted on Jan 3, 2015 in Aggression, Barking, Certified Dog Trainer, Child, Clicker, Crate Training, Dog Training, Leash Training, Pets, Positive Association, Positive Reinforcement, Puppy, Rescue Dog, Safety, Socialization, Training | 0 comments

Management, as it relates to dog training  keeps everyone safe.  Management,  does not teach your dog a behavior, in fact it often creates frustration and increases arousal.  Using forms of management are useful when you need to prevent conflict, such as putting your dog in the bedroom when guests come over.  Using effective management tools, often buy’s you some time, as you teach and reward an alternative  behavior.  

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I will fade the food lure quickly and simply reward when he offers a sit.

For example:  A leash is a management tool used to prevent a dog from jumping on someone.  In this photo, Gambits leash is a form of management, however I am luring this handsome 5 month old pup into a sit and rewarding him.  With some repetition, a person approaching becomes the cue for Gambit to sit if he wants affection or food wether he has a leash on or not.

Another example:  Grabbing your dogs collar when people enter the doorway is a form of management to prevent him from jumping or running out the door.  However, if you teach him an alternative behavior like a sit/stay then you will no longer have to manage.

One more:  Using a crate to potty train your puppy  is a form of management that keeps the puppy safe and prevents him from practicing the unwanted behavior of peeing on the floor.  Immediately rewarding your puppy with a piece of dried liver after each of the 6 or so times he pees in the grass will certainly be reinforcing, so he will repeat the correct behavior to get the same yummy reward!

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3 of these pups are under 1 yr and learning to stay.

 In Summary:  If your dog seems overly aroused, barks often, chases anything that moves, is displaying frustration or poor impulse control behavior, is it possible you are simply frustrating your dog through the over use of managment?  

Consider teaching him what to do in each situation and reward him with anything he loves to reinforce positive behavior.  This will make you a proud parent and keep him from getting frustrated, all while building a better relationship!  

 

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