As a dog owner you must here this question once in a while, can they meet?  The bigger question is do they want to meet?

I highly recommend you watch both dogs body language for this answer.  Many dogs are friendly however there are also many dogs who have not had good experiences or maybe no experience with strange dogs entering their personal space.   Yes, your dog has a personal bubble and may or may not want strangers in it.

When two dogs see each other, watch your dogs body language as well as the other dogs.  This may take 5 or more minutes as you and the other owner have your own greeting while remaining 10 feet apart.  If your dog is turning his back to the new dog, then he is saying, no thanks.  If your dog is looking away from the other dog, yawning, sniffing the ground, scratching, hiding between your legs, then you know your dog is not interested in this greeting.  If you proceed with the greeting, your dog will most likely growl as if to clarify “not interested!”

On the other hand, if both dogs are play bowing, getting low to the ground or trying to crawl to each other then you know you have two dogs who are both interested in greeting or playing.  Again, the slower greeting you have the better success you will have.

So, my suggesting is to not ask the owner anymore, but to ask your dog how he feels about the situation.

This sweet black dog below is encouraging the smaller puppy to engage in play, this greeting took several minutes before both dogs were jumping around in lovely, bouncy play.

This handsome yellow lab is not interested in visiting with the other dogs in class, he continues to have a wide mouth pant and looks away from the other dogs.  While many of us social beings would love for our dogs to love every dog they meet, the reality is we need to ask our dogs what they want in order to set them up for success.